Your Own Timeline: In Praise of Early Things

Something marvelous and strange happened late yesterday: I decided to check on the plumcot seeds that sat quietly chilling in the refrigerator. I had already sprouted an apricot seed, and I love plums, so I figured I’d try to germinate the hybrid plumcot. But you need patience for this kind of thing. Like six months of patience while you let the seed stay cold in the refrigerator. And then you need more patience–like years of patience–before you enjoy the fruit.

In August, I placed by plumcot pit in the refrigerator. I didn’t even break open the pit to get to the seed. I thought I’d do that in the spring. Basically, I didn’t know what I was doing. And basically, I forgot about my plumcot seeds that sat hidden in the refrigerator between the jelly and the salad dressing.

But yesterday, I noticed the little bag of seeds and figured I’d check.

When I opened the little bag, it looked like a ball of twine had been placed inside. It was the root! A huge root grew out of my now cracked apart pit! It swirled around, thirsty and ready. So I planted it in a nice pot on my kitchen window sill. I thought maybe I’d see some green in a few weeks, but behold! A plumcot seed sprouting already! Soon, I’ll have sapling. Then, I’ll plant the tree in the yard. Then, one day far into the future, when my daughters are off with lives of their own, I’ll sit under the shade of the plumcot tree and feast on plumcots. I’ll make jams and pies. I’ll make tarts.

As I saw my plumcot seed growing this morning, I laughed that it’s way ahead of schedule. I was going to check on the pits in March. And yet here a tree grows. I remember that my timing isn’t God’s timing. And I especially remember that sometimes, when I think something might take a lifetime, it might just come early. I stand amazed and prepared for anything now.

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